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With great power there must also come great responsibility.

Dishonored 2 begins 15 years after Emily Kaldwin is crowned Empress of Dunwall, as she flees the city after her claim to the throne is challenged by an otherworldly usurper. The sequel begins and, we’re told, ends, in Dunwall, but the chapters in between take place in Karnaca. There Emily and Corvo–both playable characters in the sequel–seek to bring down those backing Dunwall’s new ruler.

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When I'm sixty-four.

Chronos is a game about combat mastery. Hostile encounters lead you through its world, separated only by puzzles and moments of discovery. Understanding your enemies and overcoming them is key to moving forward, while death acts as the teacher that keeps you after class to discuss what you did wrong. Some foes can prove highly difficult, but learning their patterns and how they react to your actions turns such encounters from stilted and daunting to rhythmic and exhilarating. Chronos could be accused of mimicking a number of different games, but what it does with all it has makes for a highly enjoyable experience that stands on its own despite a few flaws.

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Too many hooks.

For a game with so many strong personalities, Battleborn somehow lacks a cohesive identity. Every facet from the characters to the progression to the visual presentation feels overloaded with ideas–some good, some bad, some just confusing. Because it throws so much against the wall, the end result is a scattered grabbag of manic gameplay, complex leveling, and cartoony humor. It vacillates wildly between excitement and predictability, innovation and routine, inspiration and incomprehensibility. In short, Battleborn is fun but messy, and while I appreciate its hyper-stimulating approach, parsing the experience underneath can be maddeningly tricky.

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The Technomancer Review

Game Details Developer: Spiders Publisher: Focus Home Interactive More Info: The Technomancer The Technomancer is a wonky game, and that little bit of crooked charm might be why I like it just a little more than I expected to. The easiest way of describing it is as a B-grade BioWare game: it’s an action-RPG with…

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The long road home.

In the alternate history of Homefront: The Revolution, America is on its knees, utterly dominated by a foreign invader–its landmarks destroyed, its resources pillaged, its people subjugated. This unsettling future makes for an evocative, ambitious premise, but the resulting shooter can’t quite live up to that potential, in part because it suffers from a larger than average number of mild but persistent technical issues. In the interest of providing a fair and thorough review, we’ve decided to hold our final verdict until I’ve had more time to test the game on Xbox One and PC, as I spent the majority of my time playing on PS4.

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The coolest comic book art you won’t see in comics.

Each week we search and gather up the coolest comic book art you won’t see in actual comics. The reason you won’t is because professional artists often draw sketches for fun or commissions and post them on their websites, blogs, and Tumblrs. Some artists even arrange commissions through their sites so be sure to check them out. This is a way to see the artists working on one book draw characters from other comics or publishers.

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Sneaking suspicion

How amazing that a turn-based game can feel so urgent. In invisible, Inc., I have as much time as I need to position my agents just so, but I’m always paying attention to the security level at the top right of my screen. That meter tells you when security will be heightened during your heist, and it’s a vital part of what makes this stealth game worth the gray hairs it causes.

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